Sunday, November 7, 2021

Music History Today: November 8, 2021

November 8, 1986: "Amanda" by Boston becomes their only number 1 hit in America.
“Amanda,” Boston’s only chart-topping single, came out late in 1986, but it was so perfectly ’70s that the song didn’t even have a music video. 

Boston "Third Stage" album art 

(sign up to follow by email) 
The band’s two ’70s albums had sold in extravagant, dumbfounding numbers, but multi-instrumentalist and mastermind Tom Scholz still insisted on running Boston as a part-time hobby. Scholz was (and is) a gearhead and a sonic perfectionist, and he kept his band silent for seven years. 
Read more: Stereogum
November 8, 1975: "Country Boy (You Got Your Feet In L.A.)" by Glen Campbell debuts as one of the US' Top 100 single's.
Campbell was one of the first Country artists to experience crossover success, and thisone of this most introspective hites. He sings about having achieved success and wealth beyond his wildest dreams, but he has lost something of himself and his roots in the process and is wondering why he isn't fulfilled by his stardom. 
Read more: Songfacts

 

November 8, 1980: Marcy Levy and Robin Gibb debut on the US music chart with a song from the "Times Square" soundtrack,  "Help Me."
"Help Me!" by Marcy Levy and Robin Gibb for the official soundtrack of Times Square was released as the album's lead single. It peaked at #50 on the Billboard Top 100. 

"Times Square" soundtrack
After working on Jimmy Ruffin's Sunrise album , including the track "Where Do I Go", a duet by Ruffin and Marcy Levy - Gibb and Bee Gees keyboardist Blue Weaver work together again by supplying tracks for the soundtrack of the film Times Square. The result was "Help Me!" sung by Levy and Gibb. The song was heard in the film's closing credits. 
Read more: Wikipedia

November 8, 1986: Robert Palmer made it to number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 single's chart with "I Didn't Mean to Turn You On."
"I Didn't Mean to Turn You On" was originally performed by Cherrelle in 1984. A year later, Robert Palmer covered the song for his eighth solo studio album, “Riptide.” 

Robert Palmer studio album, “Riptide”

Compared to Cherrelle’s version, Palmer’s “I Didn’t Mean to Turn You On” was not as funky, as it abandoned the Prince-esque keyboards for a smoother sound. When sung by Palmer, the lyrics of “I Didn’t Mean to Turn You On” took on a different tone. Whereas Cherrelle sounded like a woman addressing a forceful man, Palmer appeared less threatened. 

November 8, 2003: "Here Without You" by 3 Doors Down made it to the Top 5 in the US.
"Here Without You" is an important song to many military personnel who find themselves away from their loved ones with their lives in danger. 3 Doors Down bass player Todd Harrell told us that many of their songs are written in a way that is open for interpretation, and that "'Here Without You' is a song that a lot of military folks get a lot of things out of." 
Read more: Songfacts

Amanda
Boston

No comments:

Post a Comment