Monday, October 26, 2020

Music History Today: October 27, 2020

October 27, 1982: Prince releases his fifth album, 1999. It's a breakthrough thanks to "Little Red Corvette" and the title track.

Get ready to party like it's 1982 on Nov. 29 when Warner Records reissues Prince's classic album 1999 with no fewer than 35 previously unreleased tracks and a complete live concert performance on DVD.

Desktop Wallpaper

Prince dressed in black desktop wallpaper background

(sign up to follow by email)

Cellphone Wallpaper

Prince dressed in black cellphone smartphone wallpaper background

The reissue will come in three versions: a remastered version with the original contents of the double LP; a 2CD/4LP Deluxe Edition; and a 5CD/10LP + DVD Super Deluxe Edition. All three will be available on CD, LP, and streaming services, and new liner notes will include an essay by The Current's Andrea Swensson. 

Read more:  The Current.

October 27, 1933: Pianist Floyd Cramer is born in Shreveport, Louisiana.

Legendary country pianist Floyd Cramer, one of the men responsible for what became known as "The Nashville Sound", was born on Oct. 27, 1933, in Shreveport, Louisiana, but grew up in Huttig, Arkansas. 

Floyd Cramer sitting behind a piano in front of a yellow wall
Floyd Cramer


Cramer relocated to Nashville in 1955, at a time when piano accompaniment on country music songs was becoming popular, and he found more work than he could handle. He soon became one of the busiest session musicians in the business, playing on the records of such luminaries as Brenda Lee, Patsy Cline, Eddy Arnold, Elvis Presley--he played piano on "Heartbreak Hotel"--and Roy Orbison, among others. 
Read more: IMDB

October 27, 1960: Ben E. King records "Spanish Harlem" and "Stand by Me." 

"Spanish Harlem” is a song released by Ben E. King in 1960 on Atco Records, written by Jerry Leiber and Phil Spector, and produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. The song was King’s first hit away from The Drifters, a group he had led for several years. It climbed the Billboard charts, eventually peaking at #15 R&B and #10 Pop. 
Read more: Harlem World Magazine

October 27, 1973:  Gladys Knight And The Pips' only US number one song, "Midnight Train to Georgia," hit the top.  

When singer/songwriter Jim Weatherly wrote "Midhight Train to Georgia as a pop-country number in 1972, he was thinking not of trains or even of Georgia, but of a throwaway line from his former football buddy Lee Major’s girlfriend, Farrah Fawcett. Chatting on the phone to Weatherly, Fawcett — soon to be a superstar herself in The Six Million Dollar Man and Charlie’s Angels — said she was packing to catch a midnight plane to Houston. 
Read more: Financial Times

October 27, 1981: Blondie released the single "The Tide Is High."

Blondie’s “The Tide Is High” was the closest thing to a real reggae song that had ever hit #1 in America.   
Debbie Harry of Blondie close up portrait of her face
Debbie Harry of Blondie

“The Tide Is High” was not Blondie’s song. The Paragons, a Kingston vocal trio, recorded the original version of “The Tide Is High” in 1967. John Holt, the lead Paragon who eventually went on to a fairly successful solo career, wrote the song. 
Read more:  Stereogum

1999
Prince

No comments:

Post a Comment