Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Music History Today: June 17, 2020

June 17, 1972: The Rolling Stones album Exile On Main Street hits number 1 in America. The track. 
There are songs that are better, there are songs that are worse, there are songs that’ll become your favorites and others you’ll probably lift the needle for when their time is due. But in the end, Exile on Main Street spends its four sides shading the same song in as many variations as there are Rolling Stone ready-mades to fill them. 
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If on the one hand they prove the group’s eternal constancy and appeal, it’s on the other that you can leave the album and still feel vaguely unsatisfied, not quite brought to the peaks that this band of bands has always held out as a special prize in the past.  
Read more: Rolling Stones (album review May 12, 1972)
June 17, 1964:  Jay & the Americans record "Come A Little Bit Closer." 
"Come a Little Bit Closer" is a song by the 1960s rock and roll band Jay and the Americans.

Jay and the Americans
Jay and the Americans

It reached number 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1964, making it the band's highest charting single. It remains their most popular song, according to Last.fm song rankings. It also peaked at number 4 on the Cashbox chart and at number 1 on RPM's singles chart. 
Read more: Wikipedia


June 17, 1967: The Hollies' "Carrie Anne" is released in the US, where it will reach number 9. 
According to Allan Clarke, this song was written during a concert the group did with Tom Jones and the song was written mainly by Graham Nash and Tony Hicks with Allan Clarke supplying the lyrics for the middle eight. The introduction features vocal harmonies strongly influenced by the Beach Boys. The song features steel drums. The song was recorded in only two takes on 1 May 1967 at EMI's Abbey Road Studios. The first take was a false start. 
Read more: Wikipedia


June 17, 1971: Carole King saw her "Tapestry" album hit number 1 in the US for the first of 15 consecutive weeks.
For nearly a decade, Carole King wrote Brill Building pop with her then-husband, Gerry Goffin: hits such as Little Eva's "The Loco-Motion" (Eva Boyd was the couple's baby sitter) and the Monkees' "Pleasant Valley Sunday." 
Then King's friend James Taylor encouraged her to sing her own tunes. She slowed down "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" (originally a hit for the Shirelles in 1960), heightening the melancholy inside, while her warm, earnest singing brought out the sadness in "So Far Away" .  
Read more: Rolling Stones (500 Greatest Albums of All Time)


June 17, 1985: Bryan Adams released the single "Summer Of '69."
Bryan Adams appeared on New Zealand’s “Seven Sharp” talk show and cracked up the hosts during a discussion of his hit song “Summer of 69”.  One of the show’s hosts had clearly done his homework, cleverly deducing that the Canadian rocker — who was born in November 1959 — would only have been a mere 9 years old during that particular summer. 
Read more: ET Canada


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