Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Music History Today: July 7, 2022

July 7, 1990: "Club At The End Of The Street" by Elton John peaked at Number 28 on the US music chart. 

Elton John
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"Club at the End of the Street" by Elton John was released on the album Sleeping with the Past. The song describes a night on the town between two lovers at a disclosed nightclub. John stated in 2013 on Rolling Stone that this song was one of his favorites. 
Read more: Wikipedia

July 7, 1973: Kris Kristofferson entered the Top 40 section of Billboard's chart with "Why Me." 

"Why Me Lord" was written by Kris Kristofferson during a low period in his life, after he attended a religious service conducted by the Rev. Jimmie Rogers Snow. With backing vocals from Kristofferson's soon-to-be wife, Rita Coolidge as well as Larry Gatlin, "Why Me Lord" was actually inspired by Larry Gatlin's song, "Help Me Lord." 
Read more: Wide Open Country

July 7, 1979: Barbra Streisand had a Top 40 hit when "The Main Event / Fight" moved from Number 47 to 33.

"The Main Event/Fight," a medley recorded by Barbra Streisand, is the title song for the movie, starring Streisand and Ryan O'Neal. The song became the first of two major disco-styled hits for Streisand, the other being "No More Tears (Enough Is Enough)," a duet with Donna Summer later the same year. 
Read more: Wikipedia

July 7, 1984: Billy Squier debuted nearly halfway up Billboard's Hot 100, at Number 51, with "Rock Me Tonite." 

Billy Squier spent the early '80s on a hot streak, releasing two multi-platinum Top 5 albums (1981's Don't Say No and 1982's Emotions in Motion) in a two-year span. For a brief while, it looked like he'd end up being one of the biggest rock acts of the '80s — and then, in the summer of 1984, it all came crashing down when he released one of the worst videos ever made. 
Read more: Ultimate Classic Rock

July 7, 1990: Faith No More made a big move, from 69 to 45, with "Epic."

Faith No More helped ferment a new breed of metal that could amorphously move between everything from funk, soul and R&B right up to thrash and hardcore. Rather presciently, the band weren’t entirely comfortable being lumped in with anybody else in the nascent funk or rap rock and metal camps however. 
Read more: Louder Sound

Club At The End Of The Street
Elton John

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