Saturday, September 4, 2021

Music History Today: September 5, 2021

September 5, 1998: The single "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing" by Aerosmith from the 1998 film Armageddon debuted at number one on the US Billboard Hot 100. 

Legendary songwriter Dianne Warren has revealed that Aerosmith‘s ‘I Don’t Want To Miss A Thing’  was originally intended for a woman to sing.

(sign up to follow by email)

Warren, who penned the band’s seminal hit for the 1998 film Armageddon, said she had imagined a woman would sing the ballad but changed her mind when she heard Aerosmith front-man Steven Tyler in the studio. “I was shown the end of the movie,” Warren told Rolling Stone. “So I went back and wrote the song…and never in a million years thought Aerosmith would do it,” she said. 

Read more: NME

September 5, 1964: "Let It Be Me" by Betty Everett and Jerry Butler debuted on the US music chart.

"Let It Be Me" was originally published in French in 1955 as "Je t'appartiens," interpreted by Gilbert Bécaud. It became popular worldwide with an English version by the Everly Brothers and later with the duet by Betty Everett and Jerry Butler. The English language version used lyrics by Manny Curtis. The Everly Brothers rendition of "Let It Be Me" reached number 7 on the Billboard Hot 100. In 1964, Betty Everett and Jerry Butler released their version of the song. Their version peaked at number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. 

Read more: Wikipedia

 

September 5, 1967: The Beatles record "I Am The Walrus."

John Lennon’s final masterpiece of 1967 found him at his surrealistic, sneering best. ‘I Am The Walrus’ was included on the soundtrack of the Magical Mystery Tour TV film, and first released as the B-side of ‘Hello, Goodbye’.

Magical Mystery Tour

Lennon had wanted ‘I Am The Walrus’ to be The Beatles’ next single after ‘All You Need Is Love’, but Paul McCartney and George Martin felt that ‘Hello, Goodbye’ was the more commercial song. The decision led to resentment from Lennon, who complained after the group’s split that “I got sick and tired of being Paul’s backup band”. 

Read more: Beatles Bible

 

September 5, 1970: Linda Ronstadt moved 11 spots, to number 50, on her way to the Top 40 with "Long, Long Time."

Going solo wasn’t so easy for Linda Ronstadt. Coming off her debut record, Hand Sown.. Home Grown, Ronstadt felt she “was floundering as a singer,” as she writes in her 2013 memoir, “Simple Dreams.” 

Linda Ronstadt
Linda Ronstadt

Her luck would change with her second album, 1970’s Silk Purse. “Long, Long Time” became her breakout hit – spending 12 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 and peaking at No. 25. 

Read more: American Songwriter

September 5,  1981: Devo's cover of "Working In the Coal Mine" enters the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart.  

Although "Working in the Coal Mine" sounds just like a jazz standard that could have been handed down from generation to generation of the American Old South, it was actually written by Allen Toussaint in the early 1960s. Toussaint, as a pianist, writer, and producer, was part of the second wave of New Orleans' Jazz and Blues culture. A popular cover of this song was recorded by Devo and included on the soundtrack to the 1981 animated film Heavy Metal. Their version made #43 in the US. 
Read more: Songfacts

 

I Don't Want to Miss a Thing
Aerosmith 

No comments:

Post a Comment