Saturday, September 18, 2021

Music History Today: September 19, 2021

September 19. 1981: Simon & Garfunkel reunite for a free concert in New York's Central Park.

Long before reunion tours became a natural part of being in a rock group, Simon & Garfunkel did what nobody thought they would do again: the duo reunited in September 1981 for a free concert in New York City's Central Park.

Simon & Garfunkel  concert in Central Park
Simon & Garfunkel concert in Central Park

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They'd long been celebrated for beautiful harmonies but Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel could barely stand the sight of each other by the time of 1970's Bridge Over Troubled Water, calling it quits the next year. They subsequently recorded a few songs together, including Simon's "My Little Town" and a cover of Sam Cooke's "Wonderful World" with their friend James Taylor, but remained broken up. 

Read more: Ultimate Classic Rock

September 19, 1958: The movie Damn Yankees, featuring Gwen Verdon singing "Whatever Lola Wants, Lola Gets" to Tab Hunter, is released.

"Whatever Lola Wants" was written by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross for the 1955 musical play Damn Yankees. 

Damn Yankees 1955 movie poster

The song is sung by Lola, the Devil's assistant, a part originated by Gwen Verdon, who reprised the role in the film. The saying was inspired by Lola Montez, an Irish-born "Spanish dancer" and mistress of King Ludwig I of Bavaria, who later became a San Francisco Gold Rush vamp. 

Read more: Wikipedia

 

September 19, 1964:  "Bread and Butter" by The Newbeats peaked at number 2 on the charts.

"Bread and Butter" is the greatest success and longest-lasting legacy of The Newbeats.

Newbeats
Newbeats

Contrary to popular opinion, they were not "one-hit wonders"; they also had three other Top 40 charting singles in the Billboard Hot 100: "Everything's Alright" (#16, 1964), "Break Away (From That Boy)" (#40, 1965) and "Run, Baby Run (Back Into My Arms)" (#12, 1965). 
Read more: Songfacts

 

September 19, 1964: Del Shannon entered Billboard's Hot 100 single's chart is "Do You Want to Dance."

Bobby Freeman was 17 when he wrote and recorded "Do You Want To Dance," a high energy pop hit with a common topic early in the rock era: asking a girl to dance. This song was recorded by a wide array of artists in a litany of styles, making it known to just about anyone who listens to popular music. These are the charting versions of the song:

  1. Del Shannon (#43, 1964)
  2. The Beach Boys (#12, 1965)
  3. The Mamas & the Papas (#76, 1968)
  4. Love Society (#108, 1968)
  5. Bette Midler (#17, 1973)
  6. Ramones (#86, 1978)

The Beach Boys version is one of their few songs with drummer Dennis Wilson on lead vocals. Mike Love would become a dancer during live performances. 

Read more: Songfacts

 

September 19, 1970: Bobby Sherman's "Julie, Do Ya Love Me" peaked at number 5 on the US music chart.

In July 1970, Bobby Sherman released "Julie, Do Ya Love Me" as a single, and it appeared on the album With Love, Bobby, which was released the same year.

Bobby Sherman
Bobby Sherman

Bobby Sherman's version spent 15 weeks on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, peaking at No. 5, while reaching No. 2 on Billboard's Easy Listening chart, No. 3 on the Cash Box Top 100, No. 3 on Australia's Go-Set chart, and No. 28 on the UK Singles Chart. In Canada, the song reached No. 3 on the "RPM 100" and No. 2 on Toronto's CHUM 30 chart. The song earned Sherman a gold record. 

Read more: Wikipedia

 

Scarborough Fair
Simon & Garfunkel

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