Sunday, September 20, 2020

Music History Today: September 21, 2020

September 21, 1968: Jimi Hendrix releases "All Along The Watchtower." It becomes his only top 40 hit, peaking at number 20.

In 1968, Jimi Hendrix and his band The Experience began recording what would become one of their most iconic releases, ‘All Along the Watchtower’. 

Desktop Wallpaper 

(sign up to follow by email)

Cellphone Wallpaper

Written by the legendary pen of the freewheelin’ troubadour Bob Dylan, the real showstopping version of ‘All Along The Watchtower’ belongs to Hendrix and his utterly mesmeric solos. 
Read more: Far Out Magazine

September 21, 1968:  The Bee Gees had the hottest song within the Top 10 as they went up from 23-9 with "I've Gotta' Get A Message To You."

While the Bee Gees rose to rarefied heights in the disco era, those 60’s singles still exemplify their rare combination of pop songwriting smarts and gilded harmonies better than any of the other music they released. 

The Bee Gees

“I’ve Gotta Get A Message To You” just might be the high-water mark of that period. Like so many of their songs from those early stages, “I’ve Gotta Get A Message To You” conjures a staggering amount of drama in a minimum amount of time. The theatricality of the story has a lot to do with it, but so do the refrains, when the voices of the three brothers Gibb come together and take the song skyward.  
Read more: American Songwriter


September 21, 1974: Canada's Bachman-Turner Overdrive release "You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet" which becomes their only number one hit.
"I was rehearsing and producing BTO’s third album. We needed an FM Top 40 hit," Randy Bachman says. 
"I was inspired by Traffic’s Dave Mason and his song "Only You Know And I Know" and the Doobie Brothers’ "Listen To The Music." “Way back when, my brother Garry, one of four Bachman boys, had a speech impediment; he stuttered and stammered. For the ultimate tease I wrote a song like he spoke. 
Read more: Louder Sound

September 21, 1978: Shout out to this date in a song by Earth, Wind and Fire. "Do you remember the 21st night of September?" 

The story of the song "September" begins in 1978. Allee Willis was a struggling songwriter in LA  until the night she got a call from Maurice White, the leader of Earth, Wind & Fire. 

Earth, Wind, and Fire

White offered her the chance of a lifetime: to co-write the band's next album. Willis arrived at the studio the next day hoping it wasn't some kind of cosmic joke. "As I open the door, they had just written the intro to 'September.' And I just thought,  'Dear God, let this be what they want me to write!' Cause it was obviously the happiest-sounding song in the world," Willis says.  
Read more:  NPR

September 21, 1979: Bruce Springsteen debuts his song "The River" at a show in Madison Square Garden. 

Many of the tragic characters in Springsteen’s songs are fictional. But the teenage couple in “The River” were drawn from his own real-life experience. Springsteen’s sister Ginny became pregnant at age 18 and quickly married her child’s father, Mickey Shave, who took a construction job to support his family. “They had to struggle very hard back in the late Seventies, like so many people are doing today,” Springsteen said when he performed The River live in its entirety in 2009.    
Read more: Rolling Stone


All Along The Watchtower
Jimi Hendrix

No comments:

Post a Comment