Sunday, September 13, 2020

Music History Today: September 14, 2020

September 14, 1983: Amy Winehouse is born in Southgate, London, England.

Amy Winehouse's father and mother separated when Amy was nine. She grew up listening to her father's Jazz albums. She also came under the influence from an early age of her uncles who were professional Jazz players. 

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Her stylist Alex Foden borrowed her beehive hairdo and her Cleopatra makeup from groups like The Ronettes. Winehouse's debut album, the jazz-infused Frank, was released on October 20, 2003. It earned Winehouse several accolades, including an Ivor Novello Award for the first single "Stronger Than Me."  
Read more:  Artist Facts

September 14, 1968: The Archies' cartoon series debuted on CBS-TV.

The high-school high jinks of Bob Montana's comic-strip characters played out in this cartoon, the first of many adaptations. The Riverdale gang aired nearly continuously on CBS (under five other titles including `The U.S. of Archie') until 1976. In 1977, they took up residence on NBC as part of the `New Archie Sabrina Hour,' which begat the brief `The Bang-Shang Lalapalooza Show.' They resurfaced on NBC as preteens in 1987's `The New Archies', and then as adults in a live-action 1990 TV-movie.    
Read more: TV Guide

September 14, 1979: The Commodores released the single "Still" on Motown Records.

Disco left a vacuum. As the ’70s turned into the ’80s and the anti-disco backlash gradually washed four-four kick-drums out of the pop charts, something had to come in and take its place. During the disco boom times, Lionel Richie came into his own and became a gold-plated hit-maker by writing ballads. When disco fell from dominance, Richie was in the perfect position to take advantage.  
Read more: Stereogum

September 14, 1981: Pink Floyd began work on the movie The Wall.

Pink Floyd’s the Wall is one of the most intriguing and imaginative albums in the history of rock music. Since the studio album’s release in 1979, the tour of 1980-81, and the subsequent movie of 1982, the Wall has become synonymous with, if not the very definition of, the term “concept album.”

Aurally explosive on record, astoundingly complex on stage, and visually dynamic on the screen, the Wall traces the life of the fictional protagonist, Pink Floyd, from his boyhood days in post-World-War-II England to his self-imposed isolation as a world-renowned rock star, leading to a climax that is as cathartic as it is destructive.  
Read more: Analysis of the Wall

September 14, 2001: Clear Channel Communications released a list of "lyrically questionable" songs following the terrorist attacks, including "Jet Airliner" by Steve Miller, "Dust in the Wind" by Kansas, and "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" by Bob Dylan.


Stronger Than Me
Amy Winehouse

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