Monday, June 1, 2020

Music History Today: June 2, 2020

June 2, 1984:  "Time After Time," from Cyndi Lauper's debut studio album "She's So Unusual," reached the number 1 position on the Adult Contemporary chart.
Cyndi Lauper didn’t plan to write “Time after Time” at all. The New York-raised singer had already left the recording studio after — she thought — completing her first solo album, She’s So Unusual. 
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Released in 1983, it went on to produce four top-five singles, and a Grammy in 1984 for best new artist. But before any of that, Lauper’s producer reckoned the album was coming in one number short, and could she please turn in another track? 
Read more: Financial Times
June 2, 1962: Ray Charles' "I Can't Stop Loving You" sat on top of the Billboard Pop chart.
There’s this popular idea that the Beatles pioneered the idea of the album as singular, cohesive statement with Rubber Soul and Revolver, and maybe they’re the people who really convinced the world to start looking at albums that way. But they weren’t the first to use albums to say something. Consider: Ray Charles recorded a full-on country album in 1962, when he was at the absolute top of his game. 
Read more: Stereogum


June 2, 1969:  Tommy James & the Shondells released the classic single "Crystal Blue Persuasion." 
A gentle-tempoed groove, "Crystal Blue Persuasion" was built around a prominent organ part with an understated arrangement, more akin to The Rascals' sound at the time than to James's contemporary efforts with psychedelic rock. 
Tommy James & the Shondells
It included melodic passages for an acoustic guitar, as well as a bass pattern, played between the bridge and the third verse of the song. 
Read more: Wikipedia


June 2, 1975:  The Bee Gees released the album "Main Course" on RSO Records. 
Main Course, the best-sounding Bee Gees album ever, represents a last-ditch effort to reestablish the group’s mass popularity in front of their upcoming U.S. tour. “Nights on Broadway” and especially “Fanny (Be Tender with My Love)” boast spacious disco arrangements against which the Bee Gees overdub skillful imitations of black falsetto. 
Main Course album cover
 “Jive Talkin'” approximates the synthesized propulsion of Stevie Wonder’s “Superstition,” while the song itself offers an inept lyric parody of black street argot. In “Wind of Change,” also synthesized Stevie Wonder style, the Gibb brothers dare to pretend to speak for New York black experience.
Read More: Rolling Stone

June 2, 1979:  The debut album from Rickie Lee Jones moved into the Top 10. The track "Chuck E.'s In Love" became her biggest hit.
In the spring of 1979, Rickie Lee Jones’ “Chuck E.’s in Love” appeared like an oasis in a desert of disco and arena rock. Over Steve Gadd’s shuffle beat and a bed of bluesy acoustic guitars, 
Jones told a young woman’s tale of how friendship can be changed by love. She sang with passionate honesty, delving into places deep inside herself, and using a beat poet’s vocabulary, she populated her songs with heartfelt vignettes of colorful characters.
Read more: MIX


June 2, 1984: Huey Lewis & the News had the fastest-rising song within the Top 10 with "The Heart Of Rock & Roll" moving from 13 to 8. 
The San Francisco Bay Area is home of some of the greatest artists in the history of the rock era:  Carlos Santana, The Grateful Dead, Sly & the Family Stone, Journey and Jefferson Airplane among many others. 
Huey Lewis and the News (HLN), with nineteen Top 10 singles, and over 30 million albums sold, are also on the long list of prolific bands that hail from the Bay Area.  
Read more: Professor of Rock

Time After Time
Cyndi Lauper



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